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Philanthropic Charitable Team Building

In more than fifteen years around the globe, we have not met a group yet where the individuals were not able to articulate the values and behaviors that create great teams, great leaders and great organizations.

The last time I checked Amazon.com, it listed a staggering 224,196 books on the subject of leadership. It seems that anyone can write the book. Everyone knows how to say or speak the words.

In spite of this, common sense seems to be decreasingly common as the pressures of business and life increase.
Emotion – that most basic of human experiences – is hard to measure, and culture depends on it. So, we try to explain it scientifically. A lot of time and money is spent attempting to understand the science behind corporate culture, effective teams and successful leaders. And the results? They consistently point toward the obvious answer, the one we already know: Common sense is the best guide to harness the energy of emotion and to channel it into positive results, strong teams and innovation.

“It is unwise to try quantifying things that don’t lend themselves well to proper quantification.”
-Norman Glojck

Is it possible that the process that makes building teams, leaders and powerful cultures is this simple? Or, does it need to be more complex? If we charged per hour to ‘fix’ you, we certainly would gain by making it more complex. However, we are motivated by something much more human.

S.I.M.P.L.E.

Safe – Employers AND employees MUST cultivate a safe culture for risk-taking. Does the culture smell like low tide? Are people hesitant, resistant or detached? Don’t worry about extensive or expensive ‘low-tide’ measuring devices. Just get out there and get a ‘sense’ of your environment – look, listen, feel. Is it safe for people to bring and to be their best?

Intentions – You must clarify your intentions…together. Corporate goals and visions by themselves are passé. The standard ‘kick-off’ or ‘goal-setting event’ offsite will not inspire the average employee beyond a few days or deals. Read this: It’s not their fault! A plaque on the wall or a banner listing professional goals might be motivation for you personally if you created it. But if it’s a hand-me-down from your boss, forget it. You’ve got to get their heads and hearts around it. See ‘Love’ below to turn great intentions into great results. Are you willing and capable of doing this?

Morph-readiness – Employees need to adapt, change hats, and do what’s necessary to WIN. People are people. We cannot adapt our biology nearly as fast as our sociology and technology. A passive look at morph-readiness is discussed in Chapter 11 by your 5th circuit judge. The awareness of this bio-socio-techno gap is something you may want to consider. Do you think you can just tell them to adapt? Or that they have to?…wha, wha, wha, wha, wha!

Perspectives – Creativity is born out of seeing old problems in new ways. Massive improvements only come from massive changes to how we see ourselves, each other and the problems and challenges we face. Paradigms – Pair-a-dimes – that’s only twenty cents, but you’ll spend a fortune on your current paradigm if it’s not buying you what you want or what your company needs.

A coach’s job is to see what the players cannot. You’ve got to help your ‘players’ see what they have forgotten in themselves. The challenge with matrixed and cross-functional teams is they’ve got to be able to coach each other. To do this requires ‘perspective,’ one that encourages a strong commitment to and awareness of the other five principles: S-Safe, I-Intention, M-morph-Readiness, L-love and E-energy.

Love – When the pressure is on, the honeymoon is over. People forget why they were so excited when they first got ‘the job’. We are married to our work, and the ‘professional’ divorce rate is making it easier to have ten or more jobs. Find/Choose love again. Don’t throw in the towel just because your ‘default’ response to pressure is not getting you the results you seek. There is no better way to change your default settings than to ‘change your default settings.’ Hard? Probably! Can you do it? Choose one, YES or NO. Whatever choice you made, you’re right!

Love comes from a sense of purpose and relation to the things that matter to us…together. Work should matter to us because we spend so much time there. Further, it gives us the ultimate human responsibility to our social existence and the natural law of commerce. That is, to help others…and profit. We forget that if we don’t help others, we don’t profit. The farther we are removed from the satisfied/grateful customer experience, the less chance we have of feeling their gratitude and our own sense of external purpose.

If you manage a product or service and you want to see growth, you have to continually figure out how your product or service benefits the consumer. This conversation is not just about external customers; it is also about the people you manage or lead. Help them help others, and you all profit. Neglect that, and people will lose the love that initially led them to their job. Seemingly trivial complaints (the cap left off the toothpaste, for example) then become enough to trigger a ‘divorce’ when people lose their connection to collective purpose and their ‘love’ of contribution.

Energy/Endurance – Synergy comes from energy that is aligned, and endurance comes from deep-rooted purpose. Burnout, rust-out and the “I’m-out-of-here” attitude result from a lack of focused energy and endurance. To find energy and create endurance, see the preceding SIMPL principles above.

If you need help in any of these areas, everything under the sun is available to you. Just be sure not to hire copycats of well-thought-out programs or processes. They don’t have it in their bones. And don’t confuse drinking at a Red Sox game with team building. If you’ve got a culture that smells like low tide going into this approach, you’ll come out with even more stench than when you started. A dissatisfied culture with alcohol only emerges as a more dissatisfied culture with a hangover.

It’s fascinating how EVERYONE knows the ingredients to effective teamwork, but when we throw them into simulations and turn up the pressure, the usual suspects emerge and talk becomes cheap. The basics are discarded, and we find our less-than-great selves emerging. Are we just not getting it? You can probably think of ten people right now that you know need help getting back on the cutting edge of common sense. But you? Of course not!

Bill John
President
Odyssey Teams, Inc.
www.odysseyteams.com
800-342-1650
The S.I.M.P.L.E. name and process are protected under copyright law. All rights reserved.

Cirrus SR 20 landing Oakland at night

Flying through clouds.

When I learned to fly an airplane there were two licenses I knew I had to acquire, VFR and IFR.

VFR means you are free to fly the skies except through certain airspaces and sky conditions. The most significant limitation, put simply, is to NEVER fly through a cloud, hence Visual Flight Rules (VFR). If you have ever driven into Tule fog in California’s San Joaquin Valley in the winter you can imagine the lack of visual references when flying. Nothing. No lane lines or a trucker’s tail lights to guide you along. If either of those ARE seen while flying, you will understand why many instructors tell VFR students “there are rocks in those clouds.” Add in some turbulence due to a change in temperature/condition and your mind/body begins throwing all kinds of inaccurate information where a climb feels like a descent, a right turn feels left and flying right-side-up feels downright upside-down.

VFR pilots are taught a few cursory hours of instrument flying in the event – which seems very difficult to avoid in a lifetime of VFR piloting – where you may have to rely on your instruments at some point. JFK Jr. found himself in perfectly legal VFR conditions but with absolutely no visual references due to a black, moonless night, over a black body of water with no lights on the horizon as a reference to keep him from spiraling down into Davey Jones locker. IFR certification and training is paramount in those times when VFR conditions begin to lose the visual flight references required for visual flight.

Learning to fly in IMC (instrument meteorologic conditions [clouds]) opens up a whole new sense of freedom and safety — especially because I live and fly in the San Francisco Bay Area — with its four months per year shrouded in the ubiquitous morning and afternoon marine layer.

In addition to flying to deliver Odyssey’s leadership and teambuilding programs and visit our Chico, CA office, flying has also been a powerful teacher and metaphor.

And so I offer:

Odyssey was almost grounded this past December after we lost two of four good employees who covered all things logistics. We have since been in a crash-course to bring our business into the future using the cloud in order to navigate our increasingly virtual reliance on logistics and planning.

We’ve been in the cloud a bit using CRM (Customer Relations Management System) for several years, but it’s taken a long time. We’ve had some frustrating failures of relying on the old-school techniques of paper files and logistical information held by individuals and stored in their own unique methods and locations which rapidly became inaccessible related to the extent we needed that information in virtual, separate geographical locations when those two people left in December.

Like flying under Visual Flight Rules where we could see the ground, it was easy to navigate the logistical process of managing hundreds of events we conducted all over the world every year because, for the most part, we were all connected “well-enough.” Because we had not been trained to enter the virtual cloud, it placed a significant strain on our processes – and relationships when two employees bailed out of the plane.

We have always trained companies on the three pillars of success: results, relationships and processes. So, it became glaringly obvious that an upgrade and training of new processes was long overdue and the strain we were feeling in the relationship pillar was in some parts due to living in a virtual world with non-virtual systems.

Thankfully, our clients didn’t realize that we had crash-landed a few times in pulling off the logistics for their events. They exclaimed that it felt perfectly glorious from their seat with the accolades they delivered upon a smooth touch-down. However, in the cockpit, we were a mess pulling out charts and paper flying around from literally all over the place to find the runway and land the thing.

Entering and embracing cloud technology was as important as the first time we bought laptops for Odyssey employees in the early 90’s. This was the beginning of a more transient way of getting work done. There are drawbacks to being so plugged in, so connected, so remote from each other in a physical sense. But so it must be — like the first time flying through clouds with my newly minted IFR rating — that we must trust the system and each other to use it so we can have a better time in the cockpit flying this plane called Odyssey all over the world.